Besides giving your kitchen a new look, these appliances are bound to give you the ‘hands-on’ change you deserve. You might find the memories of the old kitchen coming back if you stick with old electronics. Not only have the new-age appliances changed in how they can be used, but they have also changed in the way they look too. In order to thoroughly enjoy your finished kitchen remodeling, ditch that 25-year-old refrigerator and opt for a stylish sleek one that matches the decor and theme of your kitchen.
While new paint will revitalize your kitchen, this will also be a good time to consider changing your hardware in the kitchen. While cabinets can last a really long time, the same cannot be said about kitchen hardware. As a general rule, metal works best for hardware for the simple reason that it is, well, metal. It is durable, sturdy and resistant to minor bumps and knocks. Within metal, however, you have a lot of choices: nickel and brass have a timeless appeal while steel is sleeker and more contemporary.
After you and one of our kitchen designers have selected from all the great products our stores have to offer, don’t forget: The Home Depot’s high-quality contractors can do it for you! While other kitchen remodeling companies in your area may be able to get the job done, our installers and contractors will get the job done right and have the nation’s largest home improvement retailer supporting them every step of the way. Be sure to ask your in-store designer how to take the next step in your kitchen remodel process with our installation services.
Oak and walnut are two of the most common hardwood choices and for good reason. Oak is durable and stains well while giving an appealing natural grain and is reasonably priced. Hickory, maple, ash, cherry are also good choices too so take your time and decide accordingly. If you prefer a light-colored hardwood floor, ash is an ideal option, while people who expect a lot of foot traffic should consider hickory as an option.
I shopped for days to find the perfect tile backsplash. I spent hours looking for the one in that pin. Then I walked into Emser Tile in Sacramento and it was on the wall of one of the displays. The clouds parted and angels sang…and then I found out it had been discontinued and the wall was getting demoed the next week. (#saddness) Luckily, while we were looking around at Emser Tile, I found another subway tile I loved: Lucente Cascade.
I had countertops installed the Saturday before Christmas. They arrived at 5:00 in the evening. The top was two sections of cabinets. The one section arrived with a small chip on the edge. The other section had a small chip at the seem which they just filled with epoxy. They dropped glue on my newly installed floor as well as outside. The product they used to clean when done splashed on my newly painted wall and won’t come off. Now the wall has to be repainted which means buying more expensive paint. There was a long rust colored line on the edge of the countertop that won’t come off. Nowhere else does that color appear. There is a caulk joint of about a 1/4 inch between the top of the cabinet and underside of top. Cabinet was level so don’t understand the need for the caulk. We like our choice of color and the looks of our tops. Our issue is with the installation. Would not recommend. Read less 

Oak and walnut are two of the most common hardwood choices and for good reason. Oak is durable and stains well while giving an appealing natural grain and is reasonably priced. Hickory, maple, ash, cherry are also good choices too so take your time and decide accordingly. If you prefer a light-colored hardwood floor, ash is an ideal option, while people who expect a lot of foot traffic should consider hickory as an option.
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